Lookup Formulas Training Series – Getting Started with VLOOKUP (1 of 3)

The Lookup Formulas Training Series Part 1:

The 5 Essentials to Getting Started with VLOOKUP

Download the file used in this video:

Getting Started With VLOOKUP.xlsx (432.7 KB)

VLOOKUP Essentials Guide - Excel Campus.pdf (405.5 KB)

Lookup Formulas Training Series

Video 1

Intro to VLOOKUP:
The 5 Must Know Essentials

Video 2

Lookup Formula Errors:
How to Prevent Critical Errors
Coming Soon!

Video 3

INDEX & MATCH:
An Alternative to VLOOKUP
Coming Soon!

 

What Are You Going To Use VLOOKUP For?

Please leave a comment below with your answer, and any questions.  Thanks!​

1,037 comments

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  • I’m rolling my own stock tracking workbook. I’m currently using only VLOOKUP, but I think I’ll benefit by integrating INDEX & MATCH functionality. In the meantime, here’s the evolution of my VLOOKUP:

    Original version:
    =VLOOKUP(A6,tblTx,4,FALSE)

    Improved—this matches for the current row’s value for BuyID on equivalent column headers
    =VLOOKUP([@BuyID],tblTx,MATCH(tblAnalysis[[#Headers],[Status]],tblTx[#Headers],0),FALSE)

    Better yet! This one matches for the current row’s value for SellID on disparate column headers, e.g., TblTx.Date to tblAnalysis.SellDate
    =VLOOKUP([@SellID],tblTx,MATCH(RIGHT(tblAnalysis[[#Headers],[SellDate]],4),tblTx[#Headers],0),FALSE)